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What is an ICP (Ideal Customer Profile) and Why Does it Matter?

What is an ICP (Ideal Customer Profile) and Why Does it Matter?

The Ideal Customer Profile (ICP), also known as the Ideal Buyer Profile, pinpoints the ideal customer for your company’s requirements. It’s a made-up business with all of the characteristics that make it the best fit for your proposed solutions.

You may think that customer identity is just a buzzword. Not at all. Do you want to concentrate on the most promising prospects? Here’s how to figure out who your perfect customer is.

An ideal customer profile (ICP) is a description of who will be the ideal customer for your product. These are the ones who will get the most out of your product and bring the most value to your own business.

Market research or direct touch with consumers are used to create true “portraits.” You may have one or two of these portraits, as well as one or two dozen, depending on your company. Start with one if this is your first time thinking about traditional audience profiles. Subsequently, you can add more and more – as much as necessary for a targeted and most targeted appeal to each client group identified in this way.

So, how does a buyer’s identity vary from an ideal consumer profile? A shopper character is a made-up person who represents the people you want to attract. The biggest difference is that the customer image is more about improving the user experience. ICPs are more about figuring out who will benefit the most from your product or service. They approach the client from different angles.

Why is your ideal customer profile so important?

Understanding the attributes of your potential customers will help you cut through the noise and concentrate your marketing efforts – and budget – on the most likely leads to convert. Understanding the consumers is also important for developing customized content and campaigns, which 77 percent of business executives desire.

Done right, ICP will help you recognize the challenges you’re trying to solve, match your product/service skills with consumer expectations, and shape your product/service update and improvement roadmap.

Instead of sending all leads to sales, why not give them all to marketing? Some buyers may not be a good match, so it’s crucial to figure out who can and can’t buy from you. This way, the sales reps won’t waste time on potential clients who are unlikely to become customers. You can use your ICP to figure out what constitutes a successful match. Consider the following characteristics when determining the best fit:

  1. Budget/Revenue/Company Size – What is the lowest price a consumer would be willing to pay for your product or service?
  2. Industry – do you specialize in any particular fields? Do you have any verticals that you don’t deal with?
  3. Geography – Aren’t you targeting a particular geographic area?

This isn’t a complete list, but it’s a great starting point when trying to figure out what your ideal client looks like. These are the qualities a lead needs to be able to buy from you. If they don’t meet all of these predefined characteristics, you can disqualify them and make sure your sales reps are spending time with the right leads.

Portrait of a negative client

Creating a negative portrait can be just as rewarding as just portraying the client. A negative portrait is a generalized image of a person you would not like to have as a client.

Sometimes it becomes easier to decide which customers you want to serve if you understand which ones you don’t want to serve. It is recommended here to present an image of the client, which would be a complete disaster for the business, and fix all those reasons that would lead to a failure in the relationship.

The main thing is to focus not on personal qualities, because of which it is difficult to work with this person, but on those things that make a certain product or service unsuitable for him (for example, the possibility of increasing customer churn, or insufficient conditions for to achieve long-term success).

In conclusion, at the most basic level, creating a portrait of the ideal client will help a business become more efficient. Combining a customer image with a marketing strategy is the best option to grow your business rapidly. Here are a few things to do when creating a client portrait:

First of all, create a negative portrait to clarify which consumers do not want to deal with, and which ones are not suitable for a given product/service.

Give the client a name, appearance, and personal story to bring it to life. You need to be as specific as possible: the more details, the better.

Create one portrait, and if you want to make several more.

Create a portrait based on market research and customer feedback, not your own opinions and impressions.